Home > Features of HIPs > Evidence of Title

Evidence of Title

By: Christine Whitfield BA (hons) - Updated: 8 Sep 2012 | comments*Discuss
Hips Home Information Packs Government

No doubt you will have heard a lot in the news recently about Home Information Packs or HIPS for short. The new Government initiative is receiving much press coverage and causing quite a stir. The packs which it is claimed will speed up the house buying process and make it simpler for all involved, have only been a reality for a few months and yet it seems you can’t read a newspaper without encountering an article on them. That’s because if successful the packs could signify the biggest change in the house buying process the market has ever seen. So if you are thinking of buying or selling your house in the near, or even distant, future then you need to be kept up to speed. Without a pack you could face a hefty fine!

What are HIPS?

Home Information Packs are the responsibility of the seller. He or she must pay for and compile the pack in order to present it to the buyer when requested. At present only three bedroom or more houses require a pack and as long as it has been commissioned the house can be put on the market. After June 1st however the pack must be fully completed before the house can be marketed.

So What is in a Pack?

The HIP consists of several compulsory documents and a few optional documents. The compulsory documents include the Evidence of Title, Energy Performance Certificate, Index, Sale Statement and Standard Searches.

If you like you can also purchase a Home Condition Report although this is not a requirement. This would outline the general condition of your home at the time of putting it on the market.

Evidence of Title

The Evidence of Title is a series of document which prove that the property is yours to sell. It is a vital part of the Home Information Pack – clearly because without it anyone could try and sell anyone else’s house!

What to do with Registered Property

If your property is registered you must include official copies of the individual register. This includes a property register and a proprietorship register. You will also need to include an official copy of the title plan. These are easily obtainable from the Land Registry.

What to do with Unregistered Land and Property

If the property is not registered you must include a copy of an official search of the index map. This is also obtained from the Land Registry.

If the land is not registered then you must include copies of a certificate of an official search of the index map. This can be obtained from the Land Registry. You must also include any documents that the seller will use to provide his or her evidence of title.

If you are in any doubt as to whether your property is registered or you are confused about which documents you have to provide contact your solicitor and he or she will be able to advise you. Alternatively you can contact the Land Registry who should be able to tell you your position and what to do next.

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